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+1 304 525 7333
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redcaboose@visithuntingtonwv.org
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Hours: 

Monday 10 am - 5 pm

Tuesday 10 am - 5 pm

Wednesday 10 am - 5 pm

Thursday 10 am - 5 pm

Friday 10 am - 5 pm

Saturday 10 am - 5 pm

Sunday 11 am - 3 pm

Directions

Heritage Station

210 11th Street

Huntington, WV 25701

Heritage Station

210 11th Street

Huntington, WV 25701

Hours: 

Monday 10 am - 5 pm

Tuesday 10 am - 5 pm

Wednesday 10 am - 5 pm

Thursday 10 am - 5 pm

Friday 10 am - 5 pm

Saturday 10 am - 5 pm

Sunday 11 am - 3 pm

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If you purchase through our website you can choose to pickup in our shop or have your items shipped. If you choose the pick up option items are usually ready within fifteen minutes during shop hours. Make your choice during the checkout process. And we welcome you to visit our shop Monday - Saturday 10 - 5 and Sunday 11 - 3. Thanks again for supporting local artisans!

Memphis Tennessee Garrison: The Remarkable Story of a Black Appalachian Woman

$24.95

As a black Appalachian woman, Memphis Tennessee Garrison belonged to a demographic category triply ignored by historians.

The daughter of former slaves, she moved to McDowell County, West Virginia, at an early age and died at ninety-eight in Huntington. The coalfields of McDowell County were among the richest seams in the nation. As Garrison makes clear, the backbone of the early mining workforce—those who laid the railroad tracks, manned the coke ovens, and dug the coal—were black miners. These miners and their families created communities that became the centers of the struggle for unions, better education, and expanded civil rights. Memphis Tennessee Garrison, an innovative teacher, administrative worker at U.S. Steel, and vice president of the National Board of the NAACP at the height of the civil rights struggle (1963-66), was involved with all of these struggles.

In many ways, this oral history, based on interview transcripts, is the untold and multidimensional story of African American life in West Virginia, as seen through the eyes of a remarkable woman. She portrays a courageous people who organize to improve their working conditions, send their children to school and then to college, own land, and support a wide range of cultural and political activities.

Ancella Bickley is a retired professor of English and Vice President for Academic Affairs at West Virginia State College. 

Lynda Ann Ewen is a professor of sociology at Marshall University, where she directs the Oral History of Appalachia Program and is co-director of the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Gender in Appalachia.